Taking the World’s Masks Off by Removing My Own

Some days I fancy spending extra time in front of the mirror to put some makeup on. I don’t always wear makeup, but when I have the time, this feminine ritual allows me to divagate and reflect on the importance of appearances and self-worth.

When I look in the mirror and see a more beautiful me, I feel this instant boost in confidence, as if the pigments covering my imperfections had the power to erase them all. When I see less freckles, less pores, no dark circles, a more defined gaze and a colorful pout, I feel like I have more reasons to smile, pat myself on the back and say, “You go, girl! Nothing can stop you!”

Makeup does change the perception I have of myself and how others see me. Research has shown that makeup enhances women’s attractiveness, sex appeal and youthfulness as well as allows them to be seen as healthier, more confident and having greater earning potential. A social media experiment also showed that makeup makes the same woman appear more competent, likable, fun and authentic than when she is bare-faced.

I have many reasons to wear makeup, but there are some days that I just don’t have the time to do it or I simply don’t feel like it. The decision to wear makeup or not will affect how people will judge me as I go about my day. This means that, in spite the fact that makeup does not change who I am, a Renata with makeup is probably worthier than the bare-faced version of myself.

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No-makeup selfie

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Makeup selfie

In a world where perceptions are more valuable than truth, where people tend to believe in “alternative facts” rather than facts, where people prefer online tweet wars rather than face-to-face conversations, makeup acquires a crucial role.

And I should expand the idea of makeup not only as face paint but also as everything that hides the reality underneath. Makeup can be a complacent marriage, an over-reliance on religion as the answer for all troubles, an imprisoning relationship that prevents one from doing what they really want, the aggressions of a highly successful professional that hide the insecurities that he or she truly bears. In sum, makeup is any socially accepted mask that hides personal truths.

Like it or not, we live in a world of masked people. This blog is one of my attempts to strip myself from my own masks. I want to come here “naked,” to bear it all and be vulnerable so I can survive in a world of appearances.

I won’t take the route of Alicia Keys who decided to stop wearing makeup for good as a way feel closer to her true self. This is not my route. Sometimes I just feel good to look prettier. The way I found to remove my masks was to open myself to others, to take on a good discussion, to accept that I’m not always right, that I can change opinions sometimes.

When I take these steps and let people be whoever they want to be around me, I find that their own masks start to crumble. They just can’t stand their own lies – not because of any accusation, but when they see me vulnerable, they can’t help but confront their own vulnerability. Sometimes they open up, but sometimes they just run away to their comfort zone and hide themselves back behind their masks. And there’s nothing I can do about it.

But this does not prevent me from continuing to open myself up. I just want to be able to look at my life and see that I at least had done something to make the world more authentic, more true to itself, more makeup-free. This is what frees me.

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